Quantcast O.K. Ingram

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: O.K. Ingram
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
World War I - 12966_45
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
World War II
While these  victories  cost  the  lives  of  many  of these American fighting men, many unselfish acts of  bravery  by  men  such  as  O.  K.  Ingram  and Charles  L.  Ausburne  saved  the  lives  of  others. Those    who    performed    such    acts    throughout history  gave  us  one  of  our  most  valuable  naval traditions—heroism. O. K. INGRAM In   October   1917   the   destroyer   Cassin   was patrolling off the Irish coast. Gunner’s Mate O. K. Ingram suddenly sighted a German torpedo racing toward the stern of the Cassin. He realized if the “fish”  struck  the  vessel  where  the  depth  charges were stowed, the ship would be blown up. Instead of  saving  himself,  he  deliberately  rushed  aft  to throw  the  charges  overboard.  The  torpedo  found its  mark—and  the  explosion  killed  Ingram  and temporarily   disabled   the   ship.   But   this   blue- jacket’s sacrifice saved his ship and the lives of the officers and men on board. The destroyer Ingram, now decommissioned, bore his name. CHARLES L. AUSBURNE Another incident that occurred in World War I contributed   to   our   store   of   memorable   naval traditions.  The  transport  Antilles,  bound  for  the United  States  from  Europe  in  October  1917,  was sunk    by    torpedo    attack.    Radio    Electrician Ausburne  was  at  the  wireless  station  frantically 134.132 Figure 2-13.-By his brilliant leadership and skill as a strategist, Admiral Nimitz moved his forces in the Pacific, from a series of peripheral engagements to strategic encirclement of the enemy, to cut the enemy’s lines of supply and isolate its land forces. 2-16

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.