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Chapter 17 Ship Design and Engineering
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Keel
PLATING A  ship  is  structurally  a  box  girder.  Shell plating  forms  the  sides  and  bottom  of  the  box girder, and the weather deck forms the top. The point    where    the    weather    deck    (main    and forecastle  decks)  and  the  side  plating  meet  is called   the   deck   edge   or   gunwale   (pronounced gun-ul).  The  location  where  the  bottom  plating and  the  side  plating  meet  is  called  the  bilge. Usually  the  bottom  is  rounded  into  the  side  of the  ship  to  some  degree;  this  rounding  is  called the turn of the bilge. Most  merchant  ships,  aircraft  carriers,  and auxiliary  ships  have  a  boxlike  midship  section  with vertical  sides  and  a  flat  bottom,  as  shown  in  figure 17-1.   High-speed   ships   such   as   destroyers   and cruisers,  however,  have  rising  bottoms  and  broad, rounded bilges. This shape is partially, although not entirely, responsible for the high speed of these ships. Individual shell plates are usually rectangular in shape; the short  sides  are  referred  to as the ends, and the long sides are called edges. End joints  are  known  as  butts  and  edge  joints  as  seams. Plates  are  joined  together  at  the  butts  to  form  long strips of plating running  lengthwise;  these  fore-and- aft rows of plating are called strakes. The uppermost side  strake,  at  the  gunwale,  is  known  as  the  sheer strake. It is  thicker  than  most  strakes  since  it  must withstand high stresses at these  corners  as  the  ship bends   over   wave   crests.   The   outer   weather-deck strake, known as the stringer strake, also contributes to the strength of the hull. The shell plating, together with the weather deck, forms the watertight envelope of  the  ship.  The  internal  structural  members  of  the hull reinforce the watertight capacity of the hull. Figure 17-1.—The ship’s basic structure. 17-2

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