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Apprehension
1162. Alcoholic Liquors The  personal  possession  of  any  alcoholic liquors   aboard   any   ship   is   prohibited.   The transportation  aboard  ship  of  alcoholic  liquors for  personal  use  ashore  is  authorized  subject to   the   discretion   of,   and   under   regulations established  by,  the  commanding  officer. UNIFORM  CODE  OF MILITARY  JUSTICE Until 1951 the various branches of our armed forces  operated  under  different  military  codes. The  Army  and  Air  Force  were  guided  in  the administration  of  discipline  and  in  legal  processes by  the  Army’s  Articles  of  War.  The  Navy  was guided by the  Articles  for  the  Government  of  the Navy  (“Rocks  and  Shoals”);  and  the  Coast Guard,  by  the  Disciplinary  Laws  of  the  Coast Guard. Not surprisingly, then, an act considered an offense in the eyes of the Navy may not have been judged so by the Army. Even if an act was a  breach  of  discipline  in  all  branches  of  the  armed forces,  the  type  of  trial  and  severity  of  punish- ment  awarded  varied. A  standardized  code  of  military  justice  was recognized as a logical and necessary unification measure.  Therefore,  then  Secretary  of  Defense, James Forrestal, appointed an interservice com- mittee to study the measure. After an intensive study, the committee drafted what is now known as the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). The  UCMJ  was  passed  by  Congress  on  5  May 1950,   signed   into   law   by   the   President,   and became  effective  31  May  1951. The  Manual   for   Courts-Martial,   United States,  1951  (MCM)   consolidated  and  stan- dardized   varying   military   legal   procedures. Effective  31  May  1951,  the  same  date  as  the original UCMJ, it became the new touchstone of military  justice.  Case  decisions  of  the  Court  of Military  Appeals  and  changes  in  courts-martial procedures have made necessary several changes to the original manual. The current edition is the Manual  for  Courts-Martial  1984. ARTICLES  TO  BE  EXPLAINED Congress  and  the  Navy  have  taken  steps  to ensure  you  will  know  the  disciplinary  laws  and regulations  most  likely  to  affect  your  daily  life. Article  137  of  the  UCMJ  states  that  certain articles of the Code must be explained carefully to  every  enlisted  person  at  certain  intervals.  They must be explained at the time the person enters on active duty, after 6 months of active duty, and when the person reenlists. In general, these articles concern  the  following  topics: Article 2 3 7-14 15 25 27 31 37 38 55 77-134 137 138 139 Subject Persons  subject  to  the  Code Right   to   try   certain   persons   even though they have been separated from service Apprehension  and  restraint Nonjudicial    punishment    (captain’s mast) Membership  of  courts-martial Appointment   of   counsel   to   courts- martial Compulsory   self-incrimination   pro- hibited Unlawful  influence  on  the  court Duties  of  counsel Certain  punishments  prohibited Punitive articles Articles  that  must  be  explained Complaints  of  wrongs Payment for injury or loss of property Navy Regulations  supplements article 137 of the UCMJ  by  requiring  each  command  to  post the text of those articles in the preceding list in a  conspicuous  place.  Navy Regs  also  requires  each command to include these and other appropriate articles  of  Navy  Regulations  in  the  command’s training  and  education  program.  Copies  of  the complete UCMJ (140 articles), Navy Regulations, and  other  general  orders  are  available  to  any person  desiring  to  read  them. EXCERPTS  FROM  THE  UCMJ The purpose of this section is not to make you an  expert  on  the  Uniform   Code   of   Military 6-6

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