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Authorization
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Storekeeper 1 & C - Manual for watching over inventory and other things needed in a store
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Storage of Sensitive Material
CHAPTER 7 STORAGE AFLOAT AND ASHORE For stores to be useful to your ship they must be  stored  in  such  a  way  that  both  protects  the stores  from  deterioration  and  at  the  same  time protects the ship from any dangers presented by having these stores on board. In this chapter we will discuss some of the procedures to be followed when storing and handling stores both aboard ship and in warehouses. Safety procedures for mate- rials handling were discussed in  Storekeeper  3 & 2 and  should  be  reviewed  with  this  chapter. DEFINITIONS Some terms used in storage should be defined before  we  go  any  further. Warehousing—The scientific and economical receipt,   storage,   and   issue   of   materials   for safekeeping  and  rapid  availability.  This  term refers to the detailed application of the principles of   space   layout   and   location   of   materials,   or assignment  of  a  particular  item  to  a  specific storage area at a terminal supply point. Measurement   Ton—   Usually  40  cubic  feet. This  is  also  called  a  ship  ton. Measurement Cargo—A  term  used  to  describe cargo that measures more than 40 cubic feet per ton. Deadweight Cargo—  A term used to describe cargo that measures less than 40 cubic feet per ton. Storage  Factor—  A  term  applied  to  cargo indicating  the  number  of  cubic  feet  of  space  oc- cupied  by  one  long  ton  of  a  commodity  packed for  shipment.  It  is  arrived  at  by  dividing  the volume of cubic feet by the weight of cargo in long tons  (2,240  pounds);  that  is,  SF  =  V/W. By knowing the storage factor of a commodity and the available cubic feet of storage, the total weight to fill this volume can be determined. As an example, a light tank, weighing 12.73 tons, that occupies  a  volume  of  942  cubic  feet  would  have a  storage  factor  of: In  practice,  extensive  tabulations  are  available indicating the storage factor for almost any con- ceivable  commodity  or  a  representative  group. STORAGE   AFLOAT Storage  of  material  afloat  requires  a  knowl- edge of the factors to be considered in determin- ing the storage location best suited for the stores, the precautions to be taken to make sure of the safety  of  both  the  stores  and  the  ship,  and  the accessibility  of  the  stores. BASIC  STORAGE  CRITERIA Materials in shipboard storerooms and other storage  areas  should  be  arranged  to  accomplish the   following   objectives: l l l l l l Make  sure  of  maximum  use  of  available space Provide   orderly   storage   and   ready   ac- cessibility Prevent  damage  to  the  ship  or  injury  to personnel Reduce the possibility of material loss or damage Facilitate  and  make  sure  of  issue  of  the oldest  stock  first  (by  the  first  in,  first out  [FIFO]  method) Facilitate inventories The preceding criteria and other instructions in this  part  provide  basic  guidelines  that,  if  observed with a commonsense approach, will enable store- room SKs to achieve optimum storage efficiency. (See the NAVSUP Publications 486 and 487 for specific  storage  instructions  regarding  subsistence and  ship’s  store  items  respectively.) 7-1

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