Quantcast Preparations and Processing

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: 14317_349
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Claims and Inquiries
Up
Postal Clerk - Military guide to working in a post office
Next
Consolidation
Always  use  the  proper  USPS  claim  (tracer) form(s):    For lost or rifled insured and registered mail, use PS Form 1000.    For lost or rifled ordinary and certified mail, use PS Form 1510.    For Express Mail, use PS Form 1000. When  tracing  official  mail  sent  to  Canada  and other foreign countries a different set of rules apply and different  forms  must  be  used.   When  tracing  official mail to foreign countries other than Canada use:    PS  Form  542  for  lost  ordinary,  insured,  and registered mail.    PS Form 2855 for damaged or rifled insured and registered mail. When tracing official mail sent to Canada use:    PS  Form  542  for  lost  ordinary  and  registered mail.    PS Form 2855 for lost, damaged, or rifled insured mail; and damaged or rifled registered mail. PREPARATION AND PROCESSING Learning  Objective:   Recall  the  procedures for preparing and processing official mail for dispatch. The preparation and processing of mail is the first step in the official mail delivery cycle and involves the following:    Preparation, by the office(s) sending the mail    Consolidation, by the office(s) sending the mail or  the  CMF  or  other  mail  acceptance  site  that prepares the mail for dispatch    Collection, by the post office, CMF, or other mail acceptance  site  that  will  prepare  the  mail  for dispatch    Postmarking, by the post office, CMF, or other mail  acceptance  site  that  prepares  the  mail  for dispatch    Classifying,  such  as  First-Class,  Priority,  or Standard  Mail  (B),  as  decided  by  the  office sending  the  mail,  or  the  CMF,  or  other  mail acceptance  site  that  prepares  the  mail  for dispatch    Sorting, by the post office, CMF, or other mail acceptance  site  that  prepares  the  mail  for dispatch    Pouching, by the post office, CMF, or other mail acceptance  site  that  prepares  the  mail  for dispatch    Traying, by the post office, CMF, or other mail acceptance  site  that  prepares  the  mail  for dispatch PREPARATION The USPS reserves the right to refuse improperly prepared mail.  Official mail acceptance sites must also return all outgoing official mail to the sender when an address is not formatted correctly.  To avoid having the USPS  return  an  article  to  the  sender,  personnel  who accept articles for mailing must be familiar with USPS requirements.  All mail must be prepared according to instructions  provided  by  the  USPS  in  the  Guide  To Business Mail Preparation, USPS Publication 25, the DMM, or the IMM, as appropriate. The ultimate goal of USPS and the MPS is to speed the  delivery  of  mail. To  meet  USPS  automation requirements, addresses on official mail must be typed or printed in uppercase letters and should not contain any punctuation except for the hyphen in the ZIP + 4 Code. Delivery and return addresses must be limited to five lines and be formatted with a uniform left margin with each line limited to a maximum of 40 characters per line, including spaces; and eight separate words per line. Inadequate packaging is the most common cause for loss and damage in the mails.  Ensure the contents of  items  being  mailed  are  wrapped  and  packaged  to withstand  the  mail-handling  process,  transportation environment, and in a manner that will not cause harm to mail handling personnel, equipment, or other mail. Train all mail handling personnel who prepare articles for mailing to:    Use inexpensive, lightweight, sturdy cartons or shipping  containers  capable  of  protecting  the item being mailed.    Pack  items  in  a  stronger  outer  container  when possible.    Place the address label on top of the package and make   sure   the   label   is   easy   to   read   and understand. 13-15

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.