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Managed Mail (MM) Letter Trays
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half-sized MM trays hold an average of 200 letters. MM  trays  should  always  be  filled  to  maximum capacity, when possible, but no less than three-fourths or 75 percent.  When full-sized MM trays are less than 75  percent  filled,  place  the  mail  in  half-sized  MM trays. If the volume of letter mail does not warrant using MM trays, prepare letter mail in bundles as discussed earlier and place in Priority Mail No.1 pouches labeled to the serving USPS CONUS gateway or FMC as your area mail coordinator so designates. After the tray is filled, it should be inserted into a sleeve and secured by a strap. The adhesive-backed label holder should be attached to the top-left corner of the tray. Most large shipboard commands use MM trays. When using MM trays, treat the cardboard tray like any other piece of USPS equipment.   Mail trays cost money  and  are  intended  to  be  used  20  times  each; however, when a tray appears weak you may discard it. FLAT MAIL TRAYS The USPS also uses large trays to dispatch flats. Flat trays containing First-Class Mail are identified by the green side of the cover faced outward.   Overseas Navy  post  offices  and  larger  ships,  such  as  aircraft carriers, should use flat trays if volume of First-Class flats warrant. Q9-30. What is meant by the term facing the mail? Q9-31. Which types of mail must be postmarked and canceled? Q9-32.   What agency provides all canceling machine dies and hand postmarking equipment? Q9-33.   When  canceling  and  postmarking  stamped cards and envelopes for a philatelist, you are limited   to   what   number   of   covers   per collector? Q9-34.   Letter bundles should be made no larger than how many inches in thickness? Q9-35.   What  amount  of  letters  will  normally  fill  a full-sized MM letter tray? Now turn to appendix 1 to check your answers. POUCHING Learning  Objective:    Recall  the  procedures for proper pouching of outgoing mail. Pouches  are  containers  made  of  sewn  nylon, cotton, or polyester fabric with an opening at one end. Pouches have a leatherneck strap with a closing latch and eye attached near the opening. Sacks are containers made of sewn fabric, usually nylon, polyester, canvas, or plastic, with an opening on one end.  A cord or drawstring is threaded through the metal grommets or opening in the fabric. With  the  exception  of  surface  mail  received  in canvas sacks or in brown No.3 sacks, the majority of 9-24 PCf0912 Figure 9-12.—A bundle of mixed foreign letters. PCf0913 Figure 9-13.—A bundle of mixed military working letters.

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