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Mail Classification
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Postal Clerk - Military guide to working in a post office
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Chapter 14 Post Office Audits, Reports, and Inspections
POUCHING, SACKING, OR TRAYING OUTGOING OFFICIAL MAIL A  pouch  is  a  mailbag  identified  by  the  leather strap-locking device on the neck of the pouch.   The pouch is commonly used for First-Class Mail, Priority Mail, and Space Available Mail.  Use the special blue and orange pouch for Express Mail service. A sack is a bag used to transport nonpreferential Periodicals and Standard Mail. It is closed with a draw cord and fastener. A tray is used for flats or letters, depending on the tray dimensions.   A flat tray is a four-sided tray, 18 inches by 21 inches by 24 inches inside. A letter tray is 12  or  24  inches  long  with  inside  dimensions  of  11 inches by 3 1/4 inches. Outgoing official mail is pouched or trayed just as other  outgoing  mail.    This  is  the  first  step  in  the dispatch of mail.  All mail must be pouched, sacked or trayed  by  classification  and  service,  considering priorities, transportation policies, and cost.  All MPOs must  use  the  following  general  guidelines  when pouching or traying outgoing mail:    Dispatch Priority Mail in large orange Priority Mail  pouches,  and  First-Class  letter  mail  in orange  Priority  Mail  No.1  pouches  or  in Managed Mail (MM) letter trays.    Dispatching  activities  must  not  commingle First-Class  Mail  or  Priority  Mail  with  other classes of mail.    Dispatch returned to sender letter mail with other letter mail.    Items  that  could  possibly  damage  mailbags  or other  mail  must  not  be  pouched  but  must  be dispatched as outside pieces (OSPs). Place all mail in pouches or trays, then label and tag them properly.  Since slide labels and tags are the only  external  identifiers  of  end  destinations  for  mail contained in the pouch or tray, be careful to label all mail correctly before manifesting for transport. SECURITY Proper security must be provided for official mail received  from  pickup  to  delivery.    Handle  and  treat official  registered  mail  as  if  it  contained  Secret material. All  personnel  are  responsible  for  preventing  the theft, misuse, waste, or loss of postage stamps.  Secure postage stamps in locked containers such as safes or file cabinets. Postage  stamps  and  postage  metering  equipment must be given the best possible protection against loss or  theft. Security  of  postage  stamps  and  postage metering   equipment   is   the   responsibility   of   all personnel  who  work  in  mail  centers  or  at  other  mail acceptance  locations.  The  OMM  must  maintain records  reflecting  the  number  and  cost  of  stamps requisitioned,  used,  and  remaining  on  hand. This procedure  prevents  unauthorized  use  of  postage stamps. Q13-16.   Claims  for  indemnity  can  not  be  filed  on official  mail  items  lost  or  damaged  in  the mail. (True or False) Q13-17.   What   is   the   first   step   in   the   official   mail delivery cycle? Q13-18.   Official  mail  should  be  dispatched  separate from ordinary mail.  (True or False) Now turn to appendix 1 to check your answers. 13-18

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